Blog

Summer sun protection top tips

By Kofi Dwinfour

It is almost Midsummer and naturally, all our thoughts turn to fun in the sun, either here or abroad. Exposure to the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays increases the risk of skin cancer, which is why proper sun protection is essential. In fact, the sun's UV rays are responsible for about 90 per cent of non-melanoma skin cancers and 86 per cent of melanomas.

Exposure to UV radiation is directly linked to all three forms of skin cancer. By adopting good sun safety habits families can enjoy summer outdoor activities without increasing their skin cancer risk.

Here are some top tips to help you and your family enjoy a sun-safe summer.

family with tent on a beach

SPF 50 sunscreen

At the Beach

  • Use a broad spectrum sunscreen daily. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Reapply every two hours or after swimming or excessive sweating.
  • Cover up with clothing. Look for high-UPF (Ultraviolet Protection Factor) swim shirts or rash guards, and choose bathing suits that cover more skin, like one-piece suits and long trunks. Make sure to apply and reapply sunscreen to exposed areas of the skin not covered by fabric. To help avoid missing spots apply sunscreen before putting on your bathing suit. When shopping for high-UPF clothing, look for The Skin Cancer Foundation's Seal of Recommendation.

Avoid tanning. There is no such thing as a safe tan, because tanning itself is caused by DNA damage to the skin. In addition to increasing skin cancer risk, tanning also leads to premature skin aging, including wrinkles, leathery skin and age spots.

At Summer Camp

  • Remind kids to seek the shade. Advise kids to play in shaded areas to limit UV exposure. Check with counsellors to see if there are adequate places for campers to seek shade during outdoor activities taking place between 10 AM and 4 PM, when UV rays are most intense.
  • Dress kids in sun-protective clothing. For optimal protection from the sun, send kids to camp in sun-protective clothing. Look for tightly woven or knit, dark- or bright- coloured fabrics, which offer the best protection. Don't forget wide-brimmed hats and wraparound, UV-blocking sunglasses.
  • Practice sunscreen application beforehand. Teach children to apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons, or about the size of a golf ball) of sunscreen to all exposed areas 30 minutes before outdoor activities. Remind them to cover easily missed areas such as the back of the neck and tops of the ears. If camp rules allow, ask counsellors to help children reapply sunscreen every two hours, or after swimming or excessive sweating.

On the Road

car window with uv protective film

  • Treat your vehicle to window film. Car windows don't provide complete sun protection. Though UVB radiation is effectively blocked by glass, more than 60 per cent of UVA radiation can pass through windows. UV-protective film, also known as window film, blocks out up to 99.9% of UV radiation. If you have window film installed, remember that it protects you only when the windows are closed. When shopping for window film, check to see if the product has The Skin Cancer Foundation's Seal of Recommendation.
  • Drivers beware. Nearly 53 per cent of skin cancers in the US occur on the left, or drivers' side of the body. Don't forget to apply sunscreen, particularly when spending extended time in a car that has no window film.

Additional Skin Cancer Prevention Tips

  • Do not burn. At any age, a person's risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has ever had five or more sunburns.
  • Keep new-borns out of the sun. Sunscreen should be used on babies over the age of six months.

Share your story or leave a comment below.

s2Member®

Get involved, get the newsletter!




The prevalence of skin disease exceeds that of obesity, hypertension, or cancer. Despite skin being the largest organ of the human body, dermatological research remains one of the most under funded areas of medicine. In a world where society has an increasing preoccupation with image and it’s importance to every aspect of a person’s life, sufferers of skin diseases are feeling and being more marginalised and isolated than ever.

Please submit your e-mail address below to listen to the rest of this message, for further information or for ways to get involved with our charity.

Thank you

  • Information
  • Outreach
  • Events
  • Advocacy
  • Community