skin cancer

Fact file on harmful skin lightening ingredients

By Kofi Dwinfour

The following ingredients found in some skin lightening products have been proven to be harmful to health and cause permanent skin damage.

For information about how Trading Standards are stamping out the illegal trade in skin lightening creams please read this blog.

Spotlight on… Melanoma

by Deen Kurrimbux

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer. Its occurrence is high among North and North-western Caucasian males and females living in sunny climates. There is a direct correlation between geographical location, intensity of sunlight (in particular U.V.) and amount of skin pigmentation in the local population.

Alarming increase in diagnosed skin cancer over the past 10 years

By Kofi Dwinfour

Over the past 10 years in England, there has been a 61% increase in new cases of melanoma, the most serious, and often fatal, form of skin cancer, and an increase of 41% in non-melanoma skin cancers. In 2012, there were 11,281 new cases of melanoma and 79,743 new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer. Moreover, in the UK as a whole, the mortality rate is 20% compared with 12% in Australia for a similar number of cases. More than 2,200 people die, every year, from malignant melanoma.

non melanoma skin cancer

New Developments on the Frontline of the Global fight Against Skin Disease

By Kofi Dwinfour

The 23rd World Congress of Dermatology (WCD 2015) was held in Vancouver, Canada this week (8-13 June). Held every four years, the World Congress of Dermatology is the world’s oldest and continuous international dermatology meeting. The first Congress in 1889 pre-dated the modern Olympics by seven years.

This seemed a good time to look at some of the new developments that have happened in the global fight against skin disease.

Dying to get a tan!

By Kofi Dwinfour

The past couple of weeks have brought unprecedented good news in the fight against skin cancers. However, amidst the good news come reminders that we need to do the basic things if we are to stop the seemingly inexorable rise of skin cancers in the UK.

malignant melanoma hand

Melanoma rates dramatically increasing in children and young adults

By Kofi Dwinfour

The incidence of melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, has increased by more than 250% among children, adolescents and young adults since 1973, according to new research.

abcde-of-melanoma-large

Spotlight On… Skin cancer (non-melanoma)

by Deen Kurrimbux

Non-melanoma skin cancer is part of a group of skin cancers that slowly develop in the upper layers of the skin. Skin cancer in general is one of the most common cancers in the world. They are named after the type of skin cell from which they develop. There are two most common types of non-melanoma skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma which begins in the bottom layer of the epidermis and squamous cell carcinoma which begins in the upper layer of the epidermis. They account for approximately 75% and 20% of skin cancers respectively.

Spotlight on… Melanoma

by Deen Kurrimbux

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer. Its occurrence is high among North and North-western Caucasian males and females living in sunny climates. There is a direct correlation between geographical location, intensity of sunlight (in particular U.V.) and amount of skin pigmentation in the local population.

Tawny Willoughby skin cancer on face

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The prevalence of skin disease exceeds that of obesity, hypertension, or cancer. Despite skin being the largest organ of the human body, dermatological research remains one of the most under funded areas of medicine. In a world where society has an increasing preoccupation with image and it’s importance to every aspect of a person’s life, sufferers of skin diseases are feeling and being more marginalised and isolated than ever.

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